From the 1880s, when the traditional costume had gone out of general use, selected elements of it became adopted as a National Costume. From then on it was worn by women at events such as Royal visits, by choirs, at church and chapel, for photographs and occasionally at eisteddfodau. It was first worn by girls as a celebration on Saint David's Day just before the First World War. The costume is now recognised as the national dress of Wales.[2]

Social segregation of clothing was primarily noticeable in the Nara period (710-794), through the division of upper and lower class. Women of higher social status wore clothing that covered the majority of their body, or as Svitlana Rybalko states, "the higher the status, the less was open to other people's eyes". For example, the full-length robes would cover most from the collarbone to the feet, the sleeves were to be long enough to hide their fingertips, and fans were carried to protect them from speculative looks.[5]
Dooneese was a character played by Kristen Wiig on SNL in which she is the big forehead-ed, snaggle-toothed member of the “Lennon Sisters” on the Lawerence Welk Show. Oh, and she also has baby hands. To do the costume, you need a long sleeved dress (preferably a 50s style dress), a bald wig + blonde wig, and two baby doll arms. The snaggle tooth is optional, but highly recommended.
We wanted Aunt March to be very grand so we created the largest crinolines we could get away with on the tiny stages. We used long taffeta skirts that enough fabric in them to fit over crinoline underskirts. However, making these skirts wider also had the effect of lifting them up higher so we also had to lengthen them with taffeta offcuts so they reached to the ground. Many Victorian crinolines had a panel at the bottom which would get dirty and damaged when they dragged on the ground (as we discovered!). The extra panel acts as a dirt panel which is easy to replace when the hems get worn.

What are some good Halloween costumes

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