It’s a twist on the black and white flapper that I haven’t seen anyone do yet. It is a hair trickier than a black/white person though since all of your clothing (and makeup) will need to be sepia toned (ie muted yellow/brown), but I think it would be awesome if done well. Someone make it happen please. (PS: The photo here is Annie Oakley. How cool would this costume be??)
For some, wearing Welsh costume after the 1880s was an attempt to maintain tradition; for others it was to do with Welsh identity and nationality and possibly an attempt to distinguish themselves from incomers both in what they sold at market and the fact that many of them probably spoke Welsh; for a few it was to do with marketing traditional businesses, especially weaving. There is little evidence to support the suggestion that the Welsh costume was worn just to please visitors, but it possible that this happened.

A zōri is a type of sandal worn with a traditional outfit that resembles flip-flops by design, with the exception that the base of the shoe is a block of wood, rather than rubber or plastic. These shoes are typically worn with white socks that are usually covered by the gown. The geta is a sandal similar to a zōri that is made to be worn in the snow or dirt, featured with wooden columns underneath the shoes.[2]

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[32] Researchers conducted a survey for the National Retail Federation in the United States and found that 53.3 percent of consumers planned to buy a costume for Halloween 2005, spending $38.11 on average (up $10 from the year before). They were also expected to spend $4.96 billion in 2006, up significantly from just $3.3 billion the previous year.[33] The troubled economy has caused many Americans to cut back on Halloween spending. In 2009, the National Retail Federation anticipated that American households would decrease Halloween spending by as much as 15% to $56.31.[34] In 2013, Americans spent an estimated $6.9 billion to celebrate Halloween, including a predicted $2.6 billion on costumes (with more spent on adult costumes than for children's costumes) and $330 million on pet costumes.[35][36] In 2017 it was estimated that Americans would spend $9.1 billion on Halloween merchandise with $3.4 billion of that being on spend on Halloween costumes.[37]
Kimono are traditionally made from a single bolt of fabric called a tanmono.[7] Tanmono come in standard dimensions, and the entire bolt is used to make one kimono.[7] The finished kimono consists of four main strips of fabric — two panels covering the body and two panels forming the sleeves — with additional smaller strips forming the narrow front panels and collar.[14] Kimono fabrics are frequently hand-made and -decorated.
Although the traditional wear for Japan became popularized during the Heian period (794-1185)[5] and was worn casually at the time, it is now rare to find people doing so due to the difficult process associated with the wardrobe. Each type of garment corresponds to a special occasion, such as festivals, ceremonies, or weddings. The materials, colors, and layers used for the clothing differentiate them and their significance, as the looks are also often worn seasonally. The clothing that embodies the culture represents Japan's traditional values that remain in their community to this day.[5] As it became popular in the Western world, there has been controversy regarding cultural appropriation with the costumes of the culture, specifically the "Kimono Wednesday" event held at the Boston Museum of Arts.[6]
Is there anything more iconic than a witch during Halloween? Of course not! That's why making a traditional witch costume like this one was one of our first goals when we got into the costume-making business. We pulled out all the stops on this classic witch outfit, since it comes with an eerie black dress that conjures up the classic imagery of green-skinned witches brewing over a bubbling cauldron. And no witch can call herself a master of sorcery without wearing a long, pointy hat, which comes neatly packed with this exclusive costume.

A zōri is a type of sandal worn with a traditional outfit that resembles flip-flops by design, with the exception that the base of the shoe is a block of wood, rather than rubber or plastic. These shoes are typically worn with white socks that are usually covered by the gown. The geta is a sandal similar to a zōri that is made to be worn in the snow or dirt, featured with wooden columns underneath the shoes.[2]
If you don't feel like showing a lot of skin, then you don't have to! It's quite as simple as that. This full coverage flapper option makes for an easy way to look fashion forward without showing a lot of skin. The 1920's inspired dress uses dangling fringe along the bottom to make the skirt just a little bit longer than some of our other flapper costumes. The outfit also features short, fringed sleeves as opposed to many of the tank top or spaghetti-strap styles on our other women's costumes. This outfit is proof that you can get a cute Halloween costume while still being modest, so you can feel comfortable and confident when you head out to the speakeasy.

The list of costumes needed includes a civil war uniform, victorian crinolines, bloomers, breeches, cravats, various wedding outfits and ball outfits. It also includes costumes the operatic tragedy that the characters perform: a troll, a hag, a swashbuckling hero, a fair maiden, a dastardly villain and a knight. These are all glorious costumes with some very distinctive silhouettes.


Make the Costume: Cut a quilt into a trapezoid shape; sew a corresponding color bias tape around the edges to finish. At the top corner of the trapezoid, sew a correspond- ing color ribbon for ties. Use a scrap of the quilt to cut out an oversize letter “Q” and blanket stitch it to the front of a T-shirt. Blanket stitch around the edges of a felt superhero mask and round out the look with a tailor tape measure bracelet adorned with sewing charms. Glue a metal thimble to a silver ring blank to create a superpower ring.


Clapton stated that including all members, from major designers, embroiderers, and hairstylists to cleaners, cloth-agers, sorters and fitters, etc., the costume department working on Game of Thrones includes about 100 people. She estimated that any one episode of the TV series needs around 700 individual costumes - particularly for large shots of crowds of extras making up armies or crowds in major cities, though they do not get the level of attention that the speaking roles do.[6]
Costumes are popularly employed at sporting events, during which fans dress as their team's representative mascot to show their support. Businesses use mascot costumes to bring in people to their business either by placing their mascot in the street by their business or sending their mascot out to sporting events, festivals, national celebrations, fairs, and parades. Mascots appear at organizations wanting to raise awareness of their work. Children's Book authors create mascots from the main character to present at their book signings. Animal costumes that are visually very similar to mascot costumes are also popular among the members of the furry fandom, where the costumes are referred to as fursuits and match one's animal persona, or "fursona".
Over 80,000 words of descriptions of Welsh costumes were written during the 18th and 19th centuries, mostly by English middle-aged, middle-class men, but with a few exceptions – the descriptions by women tend to be lengthy and detailed and probably reliable.[citation needed] There are few descriptions in Welsh or by Welsh people in English (but see T. J. Llewelyn Pritchard’s descriptions in his novel Twm Sion Catti). Almost no records of what the women who wore the traditional costumes thought about them have been found.[13]

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Cosplay, a word of Japanese origin that in English is short for "costume display" or "costume play", is a performance art in which participants wear costumes and accessories to represent a specific character or idea that is usually always identified with a unique name (as opposed to a generic word). These costume wearers often interact to create a subculture centered on role play, so they can be seen most often in play groups, or at a gathering or convention. A significant number of these costumes are homemade and unique, and depend on the character, idea, or object the costume wearer is attempting to imitate or represent. The costumes themselves are often artistically judged to how well they represent the subject or object that the costume wearer is attempting to contrive.

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The costumes in Game of Thrones are one of the aspects of the TV series which have most consistently been recognized by major professional awards. Clapton was nominated for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Costumes for a Series for all five seasons of Game of Thrones which she worked on, and she won twice, for Season 2 and Season 4. Specifically, the awards were for Season 2's "The Prince of Winterfell" and Season 4's "The Lion and the Rose".[1][2][3][4]

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