Find the largest selection of Halloween costumes for women when you shop here at HalloweenCostumes.com. From scary to sexy to cute, you'll be the best dressed at your next Halloween costume party with any of these women's costumes. And if you're having a bit of trouble finding the right one, be sure to check out our costume guide that lays out all the best costumes for women! Don't forget to grab your favorite costume accessories!
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]

What should I be for Halloween scary


There are tons of Halloween costumes for women with swashbuckling savvy! Choosing the right one for you starts with evaluating just how much skin you want to show on your outing as a pirate. This first women's costume gives you a full coverage option, which has a floor-length skirt, and a three-quarter sleeve top. The bust boasts some lace along the neckline to add a classic and cute style, sure to help you get into character. The outfit helps you look ready to set sail across the high seas, all while letting keep a modest appearance. Of course, we recommend you pair this with a set of women's pirate boots to really kick your style into buccaneer mode.
The best part about our Hocus Pocus line is that they feature styles straight from the film! Winifred’s dress is made of a soft, beautiful green material, with accents of dark purple and gold-colored detail. Sarah’s dress is multicolored with multiple layers on the skirt and long sleeves. And Mary’s darker, layered costume features vibrant colors of orange and browns. So really, no matter which Sanderson sister you decide to dress as this Halloween, you can’t go wrong when you shop women’s Hocus Pocus costumes right here at Spirit Halloween.
We went ahead and put together this quick guide on how to choose the right amount of coverage for you. We've selected some great looks from our variety of costumes for women, from full coverage outfits to sexy costumes to give you some ideas how to make your look less revealing, or a little more daring, depending on what style fits your personality. And, as you will see, there are plenty of attractive options to fit your personal sense of fashion!
There have been controversial costumes over the years. One that sparked enormous controversy well before Halloween 2015 is a "Caitlyn Jenner" corset costume. Despite public outcry claiming that the costume is offensive, popular retailers plan to go full steam ahead with selling the costume; one defending their conviction to sell the costume as a celebration of Jenner.[30]

Kimono are traditionally made from a single bolt of fabric called a tanmono.[7] Tanmono come in standard dimensions, and the entire bolt is used to make one kimono.[7] The finished kimono consists of four main strips of fabric — two panels covering the body and two panels forming the sleeves — with additional smaller strips forming the narrow front panels and collar.[14] Kimono fabrics are frequently hand-made and -decorated.
Red hair always stands out in a crowd, so we think you should use what you got to make for an awesome costume experience! Pop culture is full of prominent red-haired gals, so making a choice should be easy. We've lined up a handful of our favorite red-haired character costumes for women below. All you need to do is take a look and select your favorite!
Costumes aren't just for kids! Our adult costumes will have grown-ups getting excited for Halloween. We have a selection of Halloween costumes for women and men of all styles and sizes. Browse through to find plus size costumes, funny adult costumes, and even sexy costumes. Or pair up with your significant other and choose a stunning couples costume look that'll be sure to win any costume contest!

This first style is a look that's totally grandma approved! The classic Little Red Riding Hood costume brings you all the classic fairytale features of the character in a cute style that works great for any occasion. The skirt hemline stops at the knee for a modest outfit that doesn't show off too much leg. The neckline offers full coverage, while the above the elbow sleeves make for a costume that's still perfectly cute, while putting a smile on grandma's face when you stroll up to her house in the woods! Just make sure to accessorize the ensemble with a basket full of goodies, since that's another thing that's 100% grandma approved.

What should I be for Halloween scary

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