Kimono are worn with sash-belts called obi, of which there are several varieties. In previous centuries, obi were relatively pliant and soft, so literally held the kimono closed; modern-day obi are generally stiffer, meaning the kimono is actually kept closed through tying a series of flat ribbons, such as kumihimo, around the body. The two most common varieties of obi for women are fukuro obi, which can be worn with everything but the most casual forms of kimono, and nagoya obi, which are narrower at one end to make them easier to wear.
This is so much easier yellow hazmat suit Walter White (hell, that one requires a gas mask, and who has time to get one of those??). What you need: Light/Medium Green button down men’s shirt, white underwear (tighty whiteys are preferred), grey/green socks, tan shoes, and some wire rim rectangular/oval glasses. Throw in a fake gun for authenticity.
This first style is a look that's totally grandma approved! The classic Little Red Riding Hood costume brings you all the classic fairytale features of the character in a cute style that works great for any occasion. The skirt hemline stops at the knee for a modest outfit that doesn't show off too much leg. The neckline offers full coverage, while the above the elbow sleeves make for a costume that's still perfectly cute, while putting a smile on grandma's face when you stroll up to her house in the woods! Just make sure to accessorize the ensemble with a basket full of goodies, since that's another thing that's 100% grandma approved.
The company was founded in 1986 in Milan by Ennio Capasa, fresh from working in Japan as an assistant to Yohji Yamamoto, and his brother Carlo Capasa. Its first womenswear collection was presented in Milan in the same year. In 1991 the ‘Woman Collection’ was presented in Paris. Between 1995 and 1998 the fashion house opened stores in Milan, New York City, Rome, Los Angeles and Paris.

Little Women is very different. It’s about a well educated family struggling with poverty but embracing life with fortitude and genuine emotion. The costumes reference the period the story is set in and emphasise character traits, but also need to be ‘invisible’ enough not to distract from the story. This invisibility means that they need to be historically accurate and ‘fit’ the character wearing them well.
There are typically two types of clothing that the Japanese wear: the Japanese clothing (和服, wafuku), such as kimonos, and Western clothing (洋服, yōfuku). Japanese traditional fashion combines multiple styles that reflect early Japan's visual culture. It represents the culture's visible artistic and traditional values and joins them together to create a form of fashion recognizable to foreign cultures. The most well known form of Japanese traditional fashion is the kimono (translates to "something to wear"),[1] but other types include the yukata and the hakama.[2] The different styles have been produced, expressed, and transformed by artists well known in Japan, including fashion designers Issey Miyake , Yohji Yamamoto, and Rei Kawakubo. Their works have influenced numerous designers outside of the country that showcase their designs in fashion shows exposed internationally.[3] From the intricate patterns to the layers of fabric, the essence of beauty that was found in traditional wear has influenced the modern fashion that is immersed in Japan's community on a daily basis, specially found in Tokyo, the capital of Japan.[4]
The costumes in Game of Thrones are one of the aspects of the TV series which have most consistently been recognized by major professional awards. Clapton was nominated for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Costumes for a Series for all five seasons of Game of Thrones which she worked on, and she won twice, for Season 2 and Season 4. Specifically, the awards were for Season 2's "The Prince of Winterfell" and Season 4's "The Lion and the Rose".[1][2][3][4]
Of the 100 people working in the costumes department, a team of about 10 people work full time on aging and wearing costumes to make them look realistically used and lived in. The rich and powerful tend to wear new, clean clothes, but commoners do not, i.e. when Arya is traveling through the Riverlands in the guise of a commoner's clothes, they are very worn and mud-stained. As Clapton explained:

What are popular Halloween costumes 2018


If you’re looking for the latest steampunk costume ideas for 2019, then you’ve definitely come to the right place. Steampunk is a wonderful combination of historical style and steam-powered technology, creating a fun and unique look that’s great for dress up parties, events, and especially Halloween! Known for its detailed accents like clock gears, cogs, goggles, and more, no one steampunk look is exactly alike. So, whether you’re dressing up as a group or going on adventures by yourself, you’re sure to stand out in a crowd.
The ancient world harbors plenty of inspiration for a sexy look! Just take ancient Rome and Greece. When you put a modern spin on all the epic legends of Goddesses and warriors, you can create some pretty amazing styles. All you have to do is decide whether you want to be Venus, Goddess of Love, or a deadly Spartan warrior, ready for battle with one of our Greek costumes!

What did men wear in the 50s


Issey Miyake is most known for crossing boundaries in fashion and reinventing forms of clothing while simultaneously transmitting the traditional qualities of the culture into his work. He has explored various techniques in design, provoking discussion on what identifies as "dress". He has also been tagged the "Picasso of Fashion" due to his recurring confrontation of traditional values. Miyake found interest in working with dancers to create clothing that would best suit them and their aerobic movements, eventually replacing the models he initially worked with for dancers, in hopes of producing clothing that benefits people of all classifications.[3] His use of pleats and polyester jersey reflected a modern form of fashion due to their practical comfort and elasticity. Over 10 years of Miyake's work was featured in Paris in 1998 at the "Issey Miyake: Making Things" exhibition. His two most popular series was titled, "Pleats, Please" and "A-POC (A piece of Cloth)".

C’N’C Costume National, produced and distributed through a licensing agreement with ITTIERRE, offers Ready To Wear apparel for Men and Women as well as footwear and accessories. PLUS IT, the accessories division which features shoes, bags and a line of small accessories, also has a worldwide distribution network. The production facilities are located in Italy, while the distribution has a worldwide network.

What do you wear to a sock hop


Gingham! What can we say? We just love that blue and white checkered pattern, which is what defines this Kansas Girl dress. The costume has a simple style that's absolutely classic. We suggest taking a trip down a yellow brick road to visit your favorite wizard while wearing it! And just check out our fantasy inspired women's costume accessories, like a wig, doggie in a basket and some sparkling shoes to really put the finishing touches to this easy Halloween costume. It's also a great option for women looking for a cute full coverage dress to wear to the next costume party.
Sometime in the 1850s these men adopted woolen uniforms worn by English marines stationed at Yokohama. To produce them domestically was not easy, and cloth had to be imported. Perhaps the most significant of this early adoption of Western styles was its public origin. For quite a while, the public sector remained as major champion of the new garb.[7]
The timeline for the story spans over two years and each scene was very different requiring very different costumes. We had to cater for a Christmas scene, a winter ball, an ice-skating trip, about to go travelling or just back from travelling, summer outfits, wedding outfits and the transition from childhood to adulthood for the young characters. Most of the cast had several different outfits for the Show.

What was the most popular Halloween costume 2017


There are about 700 images dated 1770–1900 in which Welsh costume is clearly depicted and there are a similar number of early 20th century photographs, mostly postcards, some based on earlier photographs while others were comic. Many of these images of Welsh costume were marketed as souvenirs of Wales and they helped to preserve the concept that there was something unique about Welsh costume. Most of the photographs were 'staged' by the photographers and the women often wore their own old costumes or borrowed a set from the photographer as in the example above 'Two women in national dress drinking tea' which is one of 80 photographs taken by John Thomas (1838-1905) of young women who wore a selection of garments from three sets of costumes that he kept. [14]
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
The costumes in Game of Thrones are one of the aspects of the TV series which have most consistently been recognized by major professional awards. Clapton was nominated for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Costumes for a Series for all five seasons of Game of Thrones which she worked on, and she won twice, for Season 2 and Season 4. Specifically, the awards were for Season 2's "The Prince of Winterfell" and Season 4's "The Lion and the Rose".[1][2][3][4] 

What to do when youre alone on Halloween

×