Issey Miyake is most known for crossing boundaries in fashion and reinventing forms of clothing while simultaneously transmitting the traditional qualities of the culture into his work. He has explored various techniques in design, provoking discussion on what identifies as "dress". He has also been tagged the "Picasso of Fashion" due to his recurring confrontation of traditional values. Miyake found interest in working with dancers to create clothing that would best suit them and their aerobic movements, eventually replacing the models he initially worked with for dancers, in hopes of producing clothing that benefits people of all classifications.[3] His use of pleats and polyester jersey reflected a modern form of fashion due to their practical comfort and elasticity. Over 10 years of Miyake's work was featured in Paris in 1998 at the "Issey Miyake: Making Things" exhibition. His two most popular series was titled, "Pleats, Please" and "A-POC (A piece of Cloth)".
Costuming furthers the layers of the narrative in several major ways. First, it helps to establish a unique look for each of the Seven Kingdoms and other regions of the world, hopefully making it easier for viewers to distinguish between characters from the North, the Westerlands, or the Reach. Each of these unique fashions are also informed by the nature of each region, giving further visual detail about each of them, i.e. the North is cold but not very rich, so the Stark clothing style consists of heavy furs with little jewelry, while the Westerlands are very rich in precious metals, so the Lannister clothing style consists of more plate metal and jewelry.
Dooneese was a character played by Kristen Wiig on SNL in which she is the big forehead-ed, snaggle-toothed member of the “Lennon Sisters” on the Lawerence Welk Show. Oh, and she also has baby hands. To do the costume, you need a long sleeved dress (preferably a 50s style dress), a bald wig + blonde wig, and two baby doll arms. The snaggle tooth is optional, but highly recommended.

Clothing and fashion in the Game of Thrones TV series adaptation by HBO adds a major new layer to the narrative: the A Song of Ice and Fire novels could only give relatively brief descriptions of clothing styles, but in the visual medium of television, this element becomes much more prominent. At the beginning of the TV series, lead costume designer Michele Clapton and her team were faced with the massive task of developing all of the unique clothing worn by characters across entire continents.

The ancient world harbors plenty of inspiration for a sexy look! Just take ancient Rome and Greece. When you put a modern spin on all the epic legends of Goddesses and warriors, you can create some pretty amazing styles. All you have to do is decide whether you want to be Venus, Goddess of Love, or a deadly Spartan warrior, ready for battle with one of our Greek costumes!


There have been controversial costumes over the years. One that sparked enormous controversy well before Halloween 2015 is a "Caitlyn Jenner" corset costume. Despite public outcry claiming that the costume is offensive, popular retailers plan to go full steam ahead with selling the costume; one defending their conviction to sell the costume as a celebration of Jenner.[30]

What are the most popular costumes for Halloween 2018


No worries! We've come up with the best costume ideas for women that you'll be sure to love! We have something for every woman and we're adding new women's costumes for 2020 too! From sexy superhero costumes to slightly geeky video game costumes, to cute Halloween outfits that you can wear with the family, our women's costumes come in all shapes and sizes. We've gathered all of the best costumes for women in one place so, browse through our costumes at your leisure, find something that fits your taste and you can spend less time worrying about where to get your costume and more time thinking about how awesome you're going to look at the next party. Check out these great styles for the perfect female Halloween costume!
If you don't feel like showing a lot of skin, then you don't have to! It's quite as simple as that. This full coverage flapper option makes for an easy way to look fashion forward without showing a lot of skin. The 1920's inspired dress uses dangling fringe along the bottom to make the skirt just a little bit longer than some of our other flapper costumes. The outfit also features short, fringed sleeves as opposed to many of the tank top or spaghetti-strap styles on our other women's costumes. This outfit is proof that you can get a cute Halloween costume while still being modest, so you can feel comfortable and confident when you head out to the speakeasy.
This first style is a look that's totally grandma approved! The classic Little Red Riding Hood costume brings you all the classic fairytale features of the character in a cute style that works great for any occasion. The skirt hemline stops at the knee for a modest outfit that doesn't show off too much leg. The neckline offers full coverage, while the above the elbow sleeves make for a costume that's still perfectly cute, while putting a smile on grandma's face when you stroll up to her house in the woods! Just make sure to accessorize the ensemble with a basket full of goodies, since that's another thing that's 100% grandma approved.
Social segregation of clothing was primarily noticeable in the Nara period (710-794), through the division of upper and lower class. Women of higher social status wore clothing that covered the majority of their body, or as Svitlana Rybalko states, "the higher the status, the less was open to other people's eyes". For example, the full-length robes would cover most from the collarbone to the feet, the sleeves were to be long enough to hide their fingertips, and fans were carried to protect them from speculative looks.[5] 

Whats the best costume website


Halloween costumes in the contemporary Western world sometimes depict people and things from present times and are sometimes read in terms of their political and cultural significance. Halloween costumes are sometimes denounced for cultural appropriation when they uncritically use stereotypical representations of other groups of people such as gypsies and Native Americans.[38][39] Immigration and Customs Enforcement Secretary Julie Myers was involved in a scandal when she awarded "Best Costume" at the ICE Halloween party to an 'escaped Jamaican prisoner' dressed in dreadlocks and blackface.[40]

What should I give out for Halloween


From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]

What should I be for Halloween scary


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The next women's pirate costume option takes a step up to make for a slightly more revealing outfit. Although the ensemble keeps the same pirate style, it exchanges the high neckline bust for a tank-style neckline. The exposed shoulders let you show off a tad more skin without going overboard, while the thigh-high leg slit lets you show as much, or as little leg as you like. This cute pirate costume also uses buckle accents to create a slightly more adventurous ensemble, fit for any trip on the seven seas. These elements make it tame enough to wear to a casual costume party, but daring enough to have you feeling like the sexy swashbuckler that you are!

Clapton did speak with author George R.R. Martin during production of the unaired pilot episode, so she apparently consulted with him on the appearances of most of the initial major characters (the Starks, the Lannisters, etc.); but afterwards he did not visit the costume department very often, which gave Clapton's team some freedom to think out designs themselves.[5]
Practice your evil giggle and dress up in any of our “blood-covered” clown costumes! Our women’s clown costumes are absolutely killer for any dark-themed occasion. Or, if you want to bring a little more magic to your horror costume, consider any of our dark witch costumes—because who says every witch has to be good nowadays? Make children head for the hills with your pointed hat and witchy laugh, and you’ll smile knowing that you’re the baddest witch around. From zombies and ghouls to vampires and horror icons, Spirit Halloween is the best place to go for all of your women’s horror costume ideas of 2019! 

What are some good Halloween costumes


Much of what was written about Welsh costume was influenced by the observer’s preconceptions: many of the visitors to Wales at the end of the 18th century came in search of the picturesque and of an Eden or Arcadia and this may have coloured what they recorded. They were often delighted to find that many of the women they saw were healthy, happy and pretty and wore a costume which was distinct from that of English maids.
Up until the fifteenth century kimono were made of hemp or linen, and they were made with multiple layers of materials.[13] Today, kimono can be made of silk, silk brocade, silk crepes (such as chirimen) and satin weaves (such as rinzu).[13] Modern kimono that are made with less-expensive easy-care fabrics such as rayon, cotton sateen, cotton, polyester and other synthetic fibers, are more widely worn today in Japan.[13] However, silk is still considered the ideal fabric for more formal kimono.[7]

^ Ilid Anthony, Costumes of the Welsh People, (Welsh Folk Museum, 1975), This contains many good photographs of original or reproduction costume of the sort worn by the gentry, including men. Some of the text on ‘The Welsh Costume’ was republished in a catalogue The Welsh Costume to accompany the ladies Institute displays of reconstructions of Welsh costumes in 1981.
Costumes also serve as an avenue for children to explore and role-play. For example, children may dress up as characters from history or fiction, such as pirates, princesses, cowboys, or superheroes. They may also dress in uniforms used in common jobs, such as nurses, police officers, or firefighters, or as zoo or farm animals. Young boys tend to prefer costumes that reinforce stereotypical ideas of being male, and young girls tend to prefer costumes that reinforce stereotypical ideas of being female.[17]
The custom of guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.[25] In 19th century America, Halloween was often celebrated with costume parades and "licentious revelries".[26] However, efforts were made to "domesticate" the festival to conform with Victorian era morality. Halloween was made into a private rather than public holiday, celebrations involving liquor and sensuality de-emphasized, and only children were expected to celebrate the festival.[27] Early Halloween costumes emphasized the gothic nature of Halloween, and were aimed primarily at children. Costumes were also made at home, or using items (such as make-up) which could be purchased and utilized to create a costume. But in the 1930s, A.S. Fishbach, Ben Cooper, Inc., and other firms began mass-producing Halloween costumes for sale in stores as trick-or-treating became popular in North America. Halloween costumes are often designed to imitate supernatural and scary beings. Costumes are traditionally those of monsters such as vampires, werewolves, zombies, ghosts,[28] skeletons, witches, goblins, trolls, devils, etc. or in more recent years such science fiction-inspired characters as aliens and superheroes. There are also costumes of pop culture figures like presidents, athletes, celebrities, or characters in film, television, literature, etc. Another popular trend is for women (and in some cases, men) to use Halloween as an excuse to wear sexy or revealing costumes, showing off more skin than would be socially acceptable otherwise.[29] Young girls also often dress as entirely non-scary characters at Halloween, including princesses, fairies, angels, cute animals and flowers.
Practice your evil giggle and dress up in any of our “blood-covered” clown costumes! Our women’s clown costumes are absolutely killer for any dark-themed occasion. Or, if you want to bring a little more magic to your horror costume, consider any of our dark witch costumes—because who says every witch has to be good nowadays? Make children head for the hills with your pointed hat and witchy laugh, and you’ll smile knowing that you’re the baddest witch around. From zombies and ghouls to vampires and horror icons, Spirit Halloween is the best place to go for all of your women’s horror costume ideas of 2019! 
The 1920's were a vibrant time of wild new music and breaking boundaries! Women were breaking the social norms of the time with fashion that was deemed too controversial for older generations. We've come a long way since then, but it's safe to say that the flapper girls were having tons of fun flying in the face of expectations. Now, it's your turn! With our sexy 1920's themed costumes, you can discover a look perfect for you.
The Ministry of Education ordered that Western-style student uniforms be worn in public colleges and universities. Businessmen, teachers, doctors, bankers, and other leaders of the new society wore suits to work and at large social functions. Although western-style dress was becoming more popular for workplaces, schools, and streets, it was not worn by everybody.[8]

What should I wear to a 1950s sock hop


A costume technician is a term used for a person that constructs and/or alters the costumes.[7] The costume technician is responsible for taking the two dimensional sketch and translating it to create a garment that resembles the designer's rendering. It is important for a technician to keep the ideas of the designer in mind when building the garment.[8]

A zōri is a type of sandal worn with a traditional outfit that resembles flip-flops by design, with the exception that the base of the shoe is a block of wood, rather than rubber or plastic. These shoes are typically worn with white socks that are usually covered by the gown. The geta is a sandal similar to a zōri that is made to be worn in the snow or dirt, featured with wooden columns underneath the shoes.[2]

What is costume construction

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