Costumes are similar to a template for an alternative skin of a Hero. The respective Hero can wear the costume to change stats, skill set, class, and appearance. Costumes also permanently increase the stats of the Hero, even if the Hero doesn't change the apperance. Costumes were intended to make S1 Heroes more competitive. If you have more than one respective Hero, all profit from the stat bonus and can wear the Costume (or not). While a Hero is active in a war or raid tournament defence he is bound to that appearance; a second Hero you own could of course take a different appearance. The costume is un/equipped in the Hero Roster. The Hero Card always shows the bonus granted by the costume.
A zōri is a type of sandal worn with a traditional outfit that resembles flip-flops by design, with the exception that the base of the shoe is a block of wood, rather than rubber or plastic. These shoes are typically worn with white socks that are usually covered by the gown. The geta is a sandal similar to a zōri that is made to be worn in the snow or dirt, featured with wooden columns underneath the shoes.[2]

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This costume is shrouded in intrigue, despite being moderately revealing! Over-the-shoulder sleeves and a high cut skirt make this dress equal parts mysterious and equal parts sexy. It's the kind of look that will grab attention as soon as you arrive at the ball. Of course, the part that makes it a masquerade party is the mask. We suggest pairing your mysterious look with this black & gold style mask, which has a luxurious look to cover your face. The feathered sides also add an elegant style to any ball.
Clothing and fashion in the Game of Thrones TV series adaptation by HBO adds a major new layer to the narrative: the A Song of Ice and Fire novels could only give relatively brief descriptions of clothing styles, but in the visual medium of television, this element becomes much more prominent. At the beginning of the TV series, lead costume designer Michele Clapton and her team were faced with the massive task of developing all of the unique clothing worn by characters across entire continents.
Since World War II most areas have been taken over by western clothing. Thus, by the opening of the twentieth century, western dress was a symbol of social dignity and progressiveness. However, the vast majority of Japanese stuck to their fashions, in favor of the more comfortable kimono. Western dress for street wear and Japanese dress at home remained the general rule for a very long time.[7]
As time passed, new approaches to the costume were brought up, but the original mindset of a covered body lingered. The new trend of tattoos competed with the social concept of hidden skin and led to differences in opinion among the Japanese community and their social values. The dress code that was once followed on a daily basis reconstructed into a festive and occasional trend.[5] 

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